Pruning Climbing Roses

For Southern California's Mild Coastal Zones

 

Pruning climbing roses is not quite like pruning a bush rose. It is important to understand how climbing roses grow and flower. Roses produce hormones in their growing tips that inhibit flower formation further down the cane. When the cane is arched over so that the growth tip is below horizontal, this hormone is trapped in the tip and the cane will produce new flowering shoots at each bud eye along the cane. This means, instead of a cluster of three flowers only at the tip, an arched cane can produce thirty or more clusters of flowers all along the cane.

When: Any time from January 1 to February 15
 

 

Why:

To promote a symmetrical shape,

To promote a dormant rest period,

To renew the bush, and

To promote more flowers

 

 

What:

Prune out all dead and damaged growth.

Prune out or tie back any errant growth .

Prune out any suckers.

 

MAKE SURE THAT YOUR PRUNERS ARE SHARP; A CLEAN CUT IS IMPORTANT!

How:

Prune to outside-facing buds.

Make clean cuts immediately above a leaf bud.

For each new cane produced, one old cane can be removed.

When pruning out a cane, remove it back to a main cane or the bud union.

Arch over and tie in all canes to be retained.

Prune flowering shoots back to four to six bud eyes.

REMOVE ALL FOLIAGE.

Rake up and remove all debris from beds.

Seal all cuts larger than a pencil with white glue; do not use petroleum-based products.

 

USE A DORMANT SPRAY TO CLEAN UP OVER-WINTERING PESTS AND DISEASES.

 

ENJOY THE ROSES!

Clair Martin

1/2005